Comparing Lines of Code: Scala and Clojure (FUD version)

by fogus

A completely tongue in cheek comparison between Scala and Clojure, implementing the famous closure test.

Scala Version1

type Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious = java.lang.Integer

implicit def Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious2Int(tehThingToConvert:Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious) = {
  tehThingToConvert.asInstanceOf[Int]
}

trait ClosureTestMixin {
  def makeAdder(tehAdditionValue:Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious):Function1[Int,Int]
}

class AdderMaker extends ClosureTestMixin {
  def apply(tehAdditionValue:Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious):Function1[Int,Int] = {
    new Function1[Int,Int] {
      def apply(tehOtherAdditionValue:Int):Int = {
        return tehAdditionValue.$plus(tehOtherAdditionValue.asInstanceOf[Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious])
      }
    }
  }

  def makeAdder(tehAdditionValue:Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious):Function1[Int,Int] = {
    return this.apply(tehAdditionValue)
  }
}

val tehAdderMakerInstance = new AdderMaker()

val tehAdderPlus10 = tehAdderMakerInstance.makeAdder(10)

tehAdderPlus10.apply(9)
//=> 19

Clojure Version

(defn mk-adder [x] #(+ % x))
(def add10 (mk-adder 10))
(add10 9)
;=> 19

To perform this simple exercise the Scala version requires2 29 lines and ~960 characters! The Clojure version on the other hand requires only 3 lines and 64 characters.

Need I say more?3

-m


  1. Any suggestions for making this longer? 

  2. Nope, not at all. 

  3. Just in case there was any ambiguity — the Scala version was intentionally obfuscated for chuckles. For a much more eloquent rebutal of flawed LOC comparisions read Stephan Schmidt’s latest post on the subject.